Let Us Give Thanks

Thanksgiving is a particularly American holiday. The word evokes images of football, family reunions, roasted turkey with stuffing, pumpkin pie and, of course, the Pilgrims and Wampanoag Indians, the acknowledged founders of the feast. But what did they wear to such an occasion? Read on to find out…

Most of us have the idea that the Pilgrims’ clothing was    quite simple, mostly black and white, with white collars,  silver buckles on the hat, belt and shoes. This is a   common myth.

From the passenger list of the Mayflower, we know that the Pilgrims were familiar with colored clothing, such as blue, green, violet, yellow and red. While in Holland, just before they set sail, they knew about clothing dyes (taken from plants and roots), that were used to produce color for every day clothing. The colors were not bold or bright, but they were muted shades of blues, greens, violets, yellows and reds.

Pilgrim women wore petticoats, dresses with bodice and skirt, aprons, capes for coats and low-heeled round-toed shoes. These came in the variety of colors. Pilgrim men wore undergarments, breeches, shirts with turn back cuffs and wrist ruffles, stockings, belts, capes, and low-heeled round-toes leather boots or shoes.

Even though historically, Pilgrims wore colorful clothing, nothing is as iconic for the holiday to modern-day Americans as the black and white, buckled outfits that are perfect for reenactments. See our wonderful selection of pilgrim costumes here: http://www.spookshop.com/SearchResults.asp?Search=pilgrim&Submit=

 

This is a more accurate depiction of the Fist Thanksgiving. Notice the various pastel colors and heavy layered fabrics. They also didn’t wear buckles on their shoes or wastes. Buckles were expensive and not in fashion at the time. They simply wore the much cheaper leather laces to tie up their shoes and hold up their pants.

 

Wampanoag Clothing

You have probably seen many inaccurate pictures of Native People in books and movies. In the 1600s, the basic Wampanoag clothing for men, older boys, young girls and women was the breechcloth. Breechcloths were made from soft deerskin and worn between the legs with each end tucked under a belt and hanging down as flaps in the front and back. Men and women wore mantles in cold weather.

The mantles, often made of deerskin, fastened at one shoulder and wrapped around the body in various ways. Often, mantles were tied at the waist with a woven belt. During especially cold weather, mantles of raccoon, otter, beaver, and other animals were worn with the fur side closest to the body.

Women and girls often wore skirts made from deerskin. A woman wrapped a skirt around her waist and tied it with a thin belt. Skirts could be worn under mantles. Leggings were worn in cooler weather or to protect from the scratches of brambles and brush. Women’s leggings were made of deerskin and were tied at the knee, while men’s leggings were longer and tied at the waist to the breechcloth belt.

In the 1600s, Wampanoag men and women decorated their bodies. Faces were painted with red or yellow ocher, black from charcoal and graphite, or white from clay. Sources often write about the beautiful ornaments of the Wampanoag People. Men, women and children wore bracelets made from shell or glass trade beads. Earrings, necklaces, garters, belts and breastplates were made from various materials such as bone, copper, wood, shells and stone. Tattooing was reported by Europeans, who saw it on the faces and bodies of some 17th-century Wampanoag People. These were usually very important people in the Nation.

Dressing up for Thanksgiving is not traditional for many people but however you choose to celebrate, costumes can make any holiday more fun & festive for children and adults alike. Schools and community centers often put on plays for Thanksgiving, which can require a costume. Whatever the reason you are dressing up, there many costume choices that would be perfect for Thanksgiving.

 

See our festive selection of costumes & accessories here: http://www.spookshop.com/Thanksgiving_Pilgrim_Costumes_s/455.htm

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Hanna-Barbera Cartoons & Costumes

Can you imagine being a kid 100 years ago, when there were no cartoons? Even as an adult, I love watching them. I have kids now, and it’s so much fun to watch the same silly cartoons I watched, and hear their laughter.

Jonny Quest & Hong Kong Phooey

Unlike today, when kids can watch cartoons 24/7, I had to wait until Saturday morning to get my animated fill. I even set my alarm so I wouldn’t miss them. The biggest cartoon studio was Hanna-Barbera, who had a string of hits in the 60s and 70s, with titles like Josie and the Pussycats (I loved Melody and her goofy giggle. I think she was my first crush.) and Jonny Quest, which had a suspenseful “James Bond” edge that no other (at that time) cartoon had. Hong Kong Phooey, Speed Buggy and Jabberjaw were just plain weird. A crime fighting karate dog (voiced by Scatman Crothers), stuttering cars and talking sharks put a smile on my face just thinking about them. And I haven’t even gotten to their most popular cartoons!

Yogi Bear Cartoon
Yogi Bear
Who doesn’t love Yogi, Boo Boo, Ranger Smith and Cindy Bear? Yogi and Boo Boo steal the show (no pun intended). Their escapades through Jellystone Park were always fun to watch. Almost makes you want to pack a pic-a-nic basket and head for the woods. Well, almost. This was one of Hanna-Barbera’s first cartoon hits. Yogi was originally a character on The Huckleberry Hound Show, but became so popular that he got his own show. It only ran for two years in 1961-1962, but that is all it took for this clever bear to cement his name in the cartoon world. Fun fact: Yogi Bear was modeled after Art Carney’s Ed Norton character on The Honeymooners.

The Jetsons Cartoon Title
The Jetsons
This cartoon originally aired on Sunday nights in 1962 and 1963, before moving to Saturday mornings for years of re-runs. Set in the year 2062, The Jetsons follows George Jetson and his space-age family (His boy Elroy. Daughter Judy. Jane his wife.) And don’t forget Astro the dog, whose speech patterns may have been an inspiration for Scooby Doo’s. Other characters frequently seen are Rosie their robot maid and Mr. Spacely, George’s bad-tempered boss (voiced by the famous Mel Blanc.) I enjoyed watching the intro for this cartoon more than the show itself. A lost art, these jingles were great. If I say “Meet George Jetson,” can you say it without singing it?

The Flinstones
The Flintstones
Like The Jetsons, The Flintstones was also a prime time cartoon, until its years of syndication (which continue today.) In fact, The Flintstones was the first prime time TV cartoon. It aired on ABC from 1960 to 1966. Like The Jetsons, The Flintstones were styled after the popular Honeymooners TV show. Set in the town of Bedrock, a caveman world blended with futuristic inventions (a camera whose insides are a bird etching the picture on a stone tablet, or a woolly mammoth being used as a vacuum cleaner.) Its main characters were Fred Flintstone, his wife Wilma, his best buddy Barney Rubble and Barney’s wife Betty. Fred and Wilma had Pebbles, a baby girl, during the show, and Barney and Betty adopted a son, Bamm-Bamm. And we can’t forget Dino, Fred’s pet dinosaur. Many famous celebrities allowed their likenesses and voices in the series, including Gary Granite (Cary Grant), Rock Quarry/Hudstone (Rock Hudson), Alvin Brickrock (Alfred Hitchcock), Leonard Bernstone (Leonard Bernstein), Clark Gravel (Clark Gable), Walter Concrete (Walter Cronkite) and Jay Bondrock (James Bond). The first two years, the show was co-sponsored by Winston Cigarettes. Fred and Wilma appeared in several black and white television commercials (appearing at the end of the episode) pitching the cigarettes as they smoked. Naughty, naughty! Can you image Homer and Marge doing that?

Scooby Doo Mystery Machine
Scooby Doo
A combination of great characters (Scooby, Shaggy, Fred, Daphne and Velma), cool music and fun storylines made Scooby Doo an instant hit with kids and adults. First shown on CBS in 1969, over 250 episodes and movies have been made since, and continue even now. Through the years, voices and animation styles have changed. The recent films are long removed from the original storylines. I would love to see a movie done more true to the original Scooby Doo, Where Are You? series. The show also added and subtracted new characters like Scooby-Dum and Scrappy Doo (both of which were annoying to me.) I believe when people think fondly of the show, they think of the first 49 episodes, which ran between 1969 and 1973. The mysteries were a little darker and funnier (I know there is not such a word.). Scooby and Shaggy stole the show, and any food they could find along the way. Their interactions were priceless. Somehow these two chickens were always in the middle of solving the mysteries that constantly found the gang. Words and phrases like zoinks, jinkies, I smell a mystery and I’ve lost my glasses, all make us smile and think fondly about this cartoon. Interesting fact about this program; two of the voice actors have continued their roles throughout the series and all its changes. Frank Welker has been the constant voice of Fred Jones, except for the films (Freddie Prinze, Jr.) and the A Pup Named Scooby-Doo series. That’s 40 years of Freddie. The voice of Shaggy has mainly been Casey Kasem (founder of American Top 40) since day one. The voice of Scooby was Don Messick until his death in 1997; nearly 30 years. Mr. Messick also voiced other notable Hanna-Barbera cartoon characters, Ranger Smith and Boo Boo Bear, Muttley, Bamm-Bamm Rubble, Astro, Dr. Benton Quest, and Papa Smurf. Scooby, Scooby Doo!

Check out these fun Hanna-Barbera Halloween Costumes from SpookShop.com

Yogi Bear Mascot CostumeAdult Jane Jetson Costume
Adult Pebbles Flinstone CostumeAdult Scooby Doo Costume - Shaggy
Adult Scooby Doo Costumes
Yogi Bear Mascot Costume
Adult Flinstones Costumes
Sexy Judy Jetson Costume